Studying at the Institute of Latin American Studies

The School of Advanced Study is the UK's national research hub in the humanities and offers a world-class research environment to our research students. We run a range of research training programmes, open to all postgraduate students, as well as an active public engagement calendar. The School is part of the AHRC-funded Lonon Arts and Humanities Partnership (LAHP), through which we are able to offer a number of studentships in humanities disciplines. Our institutes also offer a range of bursaries and studentships for applicants on our programmes.

FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES

The Institute of Latin American Studies occupies a unique position at the core of academic study of the region in the UK. Internationally recognised as a centre of excellence for research facilitation, it serves the wider community through organising academic events, providing online research resourcespublishing scholarly writings and hosting visiting fellows.

It possesses a world-class library dedicated to the study of Latin America and is the administrative home of the highly respected Journal of Latin American Studies.

More about the INSTITUTE OF LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES

Research degrees in the field of Latin American Studies are also available through Professor Catherine Davies, Director of the Institute of Modern Langauges Research and Dr David James Cantor, Director of the Refugee Law Initative, part of the Institute of Commonwealth Studies.

Distance Learning

From autumn 2017, the School of Advanced Study will offer students with an appropriate topic and level of local resource the opportunity to undertake a PhD by distance learning

Distance Learning

From autumn 2017, the School of Advanced Study will offer students with an appropriate topic and level of local resource the opportunity to undertake a PhD by distance learning. These students are required to attend our London campus at set intervals to complete an intensive research training module, for upgrade, and for the viva but will otherwise study at their own location. This option is available to UK, EU and international students on the same basis as our on-campus PhD programmes (three years full time, six years part time). Fees are the same as for our on-campus PhD programmes. Please note that not all institutes and supervisors offer this option, and that some topics are not appropriate to be studied this way.

If you would like to be considered for our Research Degree programme via Distance Learning, please download and fill out the Research Degrees by Distance Learning form, to attach to your online application.

 

How to Apply

Before agreeing to accept you, the School will require you to submit a research proposal, so it is worthwhile having this drafted ahead of a formal application. Guidelines on drafting your research proposal.

Once you have contacted the School, you will be put in touch with a potential supervisor. It is important that you discuss your outline research proposal with them, and that you feel you can work together. Your supervisor will discuss any further development or re-focusing of your proposal before the formal application is taken to the relevant Research Degrees Committee for approval.

Please apply by clicking the links to the appropriate online application form.

Apply Apply (DISTANCE LEARNING)

 

Subject Areas

The Institute of Latin American Studies offers doctoral research supervision in the following broad areas:

  • Colonial Latin America
  • Latin American history, historiography and anthropology
  • Andean History
  • Postcolonial Latin American history
  • Independence and revolution in Latin America
  • Anthropology

  • Ethnography
  • Social movements and citizenship practices
  • Transitional justice, human rights and memory work

 

Supervisors

Professor Linda Newson

Director of the Institute of Latin American Studies

Linda Newson

Email | Research Profile

Bio

Summary of research interests and expertise:

Latin America and the Philippines during the Spanish colonial period; the impact of colonial rule on indigenous societies; the Portuguese slave trade to Spanish America; and the history of medicine in early colonial Spanish America.

Topics:  

  • Colonial Latin American history
  • Colonial Latin American geography
  • The economic and social history of Latin America up to 1800
  • The demographic history of Latin America to 1800
  • The African slave trade to Latin America
  • The history of science and medicine in Latin America
  • The missionary orders in colonial Latin America
  • The colonial Spanish Philippines

Dr Mark Thurner

Reader in Latin American Studies

Linda Newson

Email | Research Profile

Bio

Dr Mark Thurner is an internationally recognized senior scholar in the fields of Latin American History and Anthropology. Mark joined ILAS and SAS in 2014. His current research concerns the history and theory of historiography and museography in Latin America and Europe.

He is particularly keen to supervise promising postgraduates developing pioneering research programmes in intellectual and cultural history, the history of anthropology and of natural history, postcolonial studies, and museum studies.

Topics:  

  • History of Latin American historiography
  • History of Latin American anthropology
  • History of museums and collecting in Latin America and Iberia
  • Andean History
  • Postcolonial Latin American history
  • Independence and revolution in Latin America

Dr Ainhoa Montoya

Lecturer in Latin American Studies

Linda Newson

Email | Research Profile

Bio

My research focuses on post-conflict violence and conflicts over natural resources.

My forthcoming book The Violence of Democracy: Unraveling Political Life in Post-War El Salvador explores ethnographically how Salvadorans have made sense of a violent peace and the political life of their country in the context of a liberal market democracy. Based on research coinciding with the 2009 elections, the book demonstrates how various forms of violence have become entangled with democracy-related imaginaries and practices in post-war El Salvador.

My current research, funded by an ESRC Future Research Leaders Fellowship, examines the legal cultures at work in the realm of mineral governance in Central America. The goal of this research is to achieve an understanding of the relationship between the legal and the moral as it plays out in environmental politics. This project involves fieldwork with some of the actors in Central America, as well as Washington DC, Geneva and London, who are shaping these legal cultures.

I have also acted as an expert witness in asylum appeal cases in the UK involving Salvadorans.

Topics:  

  • The anthropology of violence and conflict
  • The anthropology of democracy and state transformation
  • The ethnography of the law
  • The anthropology of the environment and natural resources
  • Social movements and citizenship practices
  • Transitional justice, human rights and memory work